A Rescue from Crustaceanicus

Per advice from well meaning advisors, this entry is entirely fictitious. It involves flying the sheriff out to the island, and turning right around and flying a distraught victim off the island.  It is an airplane story only on the basis of center of gravity and freedom of control movement issues.

The control and CG issues were due their only being two seats in the airplane – one for me and one for the passenger. (This was common on freight runs or in a medevac flight when the aircraft was configured into “no seats” mode with all of the seats, except the pilot and co-pilot’s, removed.)  But the meat of this story is around all the events that led to the fastest island extraction I’ve ever done.

The drama took place on an island that had a funky upslope runway.  You would “land up” from the sea (pointing south) and “take off down towards it” (to the north) typically.  It sounds heroic, but is pretty easy and casual when you get used to it.  If the wind was really blowing hard from the north, you could bravely land downhill (into the wind) since your actual ground speed could be as little as 10 or 20 mph if you had 40 or 30 mph on the nose.

We’ll call this island Crustaceanicus.  There are many such runways off the coast of Maine, but most are unknown, unpublished or no longer used.  This one, however, saw use at least three times per day, weather permitting.

Continue reading A Rescue from Crustaceanicus

Mentor Mortis (Part 1 of 3)

As you read the accident report, try and accept the fact that a mere 22 years ago, pilots often did things that were questionable at best.  To keep the job, to get your foot in the door, or to conform to norms in your company and culture you did silly stuff.  Never mind the customized approach to that god forsaken airstrip that you’d been sent to, you’d succumb to things that, technically, may not have been on the up and up with the FARs.

What is even more striking is that all of this “off script” behavior was rarely the stuff that got you hurt.  What killed my teachers, was a lack of simple risk mitigation, awareness, and plain old decision making that got the swiss cheese holes to line up.  In aviation we recognize that it is a series of things that typically lead to an accident.  Our job, to live and be safe, is to constantly be thinking the stacking of bad, vs. the stacking of good. (I wrote about this once upon a time for the turbine crowd here.)

This story is about the day I stopped flying, sometime in 2001, when enough of my mentors had died that I thought, at a minimum, I could take some time off to reflect.  I should take a good luck at my own suspect judgement, sub-par skill set and poor choices in equipment, destinations and jobs to fly.

Mostly, it was time to give thanks for the large scoops of good luck that had fallen on me in years where I was doing the riskiest stuff.

Continue reading Mentor Mortis (Part 1 of 3)

“De runway, she’s gone.”

Sometimes, in the frozen bays of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, your frozen runway might not last long.  That area you landed on yesterday? Gone… overnight.

“I look out de window, and dare was de runway … gone.”

The only French Canadian in the village was called Patrick McKinnon, and he reported all matters flying conditions to visiting pilots.

And all the english speakers? They had french names, but didn’t speak french.

The Lessards, the Beaubiens and of course the LeBlancs would ask:  “Can you read my mail? ”

“S’from de governmen’,” would be the explanation.  As a visiting bi-lingual city person I had multiple uses.  Fly the airplane and read the mail from Le Gouvernment du Québec.  As an anglo, meeting people with french names who spoke with french accents who could not read french was an eye opener.  Welcome to the Lower North Shore.

Continue reading “De runway, she’s gone.”

University of Okavango

AIV is empty. And being closely guarded by professionals.

When I think about people like Bunte, Jordan or Sparks, Mark or Neil, or a few others with a few too many hours in single engined aircraft, I realize that my education began after college, somewhere far from Western Massachusetts.   You might argue that my graduate education began with learning the engineering limitations of a group of tired Cessna 206s, while also introducing jumpy Americans to the Okavango Delta of Northern Botswana.

In this first picture we can see a happy 206, that is empty, and resting whilst being carefully guarded by some great creatures, who also serve as the magnet to bring the jumpy Americans out to Mombo in the first place.

Continue reading University of Okavango

Landing the Cessna Skywagon and Related Mythology

185-landing
Yes, it can be this easy.

Let’s admit that all taildraggers are different.  Some way way different.  Some are easy and some are mean.  I have not landed a Douglas DC-3, but I bet it is easier than a Super Cub on a cross-windy day.

Regarding the cult of the Skywagon and related 185 / 180 obsessors, I can offer this from 47 years of breathing, 25 of which I’ve spent teaching flying things:  The Cessna 180 / 185 Skywagon is an easy thing to land, to land well, with grace and aplomb, when you master key principles:

Continue reading Landing the Cessna Skywagon and Related Mythology

Aircraft Valuation Part 1

One of the challenges of representing buyers, whether it is a Super Cub, King Air or Phenom is knowing where to start the opening shot: The offer.

How do you proffer a number to an aircraft seller that shows the seller multiple  things?  For example, your contact and methods demonstrate:

  • Your math accounts for outliers such as super low or high airframe total time, damage history, missing logs or a run out engine.  (And when these are great.)
  • An offer that is serious (i.e. committed / real buyer) and likely to close.
  • A number that is fair and close to what other transactions are valued at for the same make, model and age aircraft.  (And how to find hidden gems here.)
  • Adequate respect and mindfulness on how you handle the seller’s conditions or needs. (A smooth sale has as much to do with emotional self awareness, as it does the spreadsheet of how you structured the offer.)

Continue reading Aircraft Valuation Part 1

Buy Learn Fly

Some new or aspiring pilots know what they want: Big tires, a tailwheel and being “off airport” just as much as “on airport.”  If you land on the water, or are a helicopter, you’ll get used to the tower saying “land at your own risk.”  This is music to the ears of those who chose a slightly unconventional learning path.

What do you seek? (In your aviation dreams?)

The cookie cutter flight school program? Or do you value critical skills early on that are often not taught until you fly your first seaplane or gravel bar landing tundra tired Super Cub?

It wasn’t too long ago that we all learned to fly a tail dragger in a field somewhere near a bigger airport.  Most also turned out to be really good pilots for the simple reason that they had to use their feet (i.e. rudder) and an intuitive connection and approach to much of their flying.  Just ask Sully.

Continue reading Buy Learn Fly

CIGAR TIPS

cub(aka CCIGGARR TIPPS)

The beauty of mnemonic devices is that they allow the tail wheel, seaplane or helicopter pilot do a checklist without the use of both hands.  While there are checklist purists out there who may disagree with my methods, let me offer this:  If you fly many different aircraft, whose checklists can be absent, inappropriate, out of date, etc. it is best to develop your own.  A good way to build that base, for everything from a J-3 Cub up to t Beech 18, is to use, what I’ll term, “the classics.”  CIGAR TIPS and GUMPS (more on GUMPS in another post.)

Continue reading CIGAR TIPS

Pattern Work

US Navy F-18 Landing Typical Profile

I’m near certain that umpteen zillion posts have written about this subject.  Nevertheless, here I go with my addition to the pile.

How do you teach students to land safely, who didn’t know how to fly a mere 10 hours ago?

The answer, to me, is 100% about feel, energy management (à la glider teaching), looking, sensing and adjusting as necessary.  A trap that I, and many of my colleagues, have fallen into is thinking that landing is something a student will embrace if they are given firm numbers, power settings, checkpoints etc.  Any type of recipe that emphasizes standardization exclusively does two big disservices to the student:

Continue reading Pattern Work

Airbus and the C Series

“So … our cousins in Montreal have a little problem.”

Conceiving, designing, prototyping and launching a great airplane isn’t enough.  You need buckets of money.  Container ships of it.  Some connections with the mob, won’t hurt either.  Better yet, if you are in a big hurry, a rich and connected European aunt or uncle.  Perhaps the best, simplest overview of how it all went down can be found here.

That way, when Boeing comes after you, you can run to the only other safe harbor in town – Airbus.  A good lesson for early entrepreneurs here (not that Bombardier has the “hey… Armand.. make me a snowmobile, esti!” feel to it anymore) is that being heavily diluted and living to talk about it is better than being cut off from the US market and certain death.

If I was an aviation tarot card reader I would say something smart like, “There was no other way for this to work.  It was written!”

For us scrappy people of the start up world, this is a great story if only for how it ended.  While Bombardier to some may no longer be the epitome of agility, brilliance or innovation, it is nice to see a relative “little person” find safe harbor from the sledgehammer of abuse, myopic policy, and too many litigious hit men in the boardroom.