Landing the Cessna Skywagon and Related Mythology.

185-landing
Yes, it can be this easy.

Let’s admit that all taildraggers are different.  Some way way different.  Some are easy and some are mean.  I have not landed a Douglas DC-3, but I bet it is easier than a Super Cub on a cross-windy day.

Regarding the cult of the Skywagon and related 185 / 180 obsessors, I can offer this from 47 years of breathing, 25 of which I’ve spent teaching flying things:  The Cessna 180 / 185 Skywagon is an easy thing to land, to land well, with grace and aplomb, when you master key principles:

Continue reading Landing the Cessna Skywagon and Related Mythology.

CIGAR TIPS

cub(aka CCIGGARR TIPPS)

The beauty of mnemonic devices is that they allow the tail wheel, seaplane or helicopter pilot do a checklist without the use of both hands.  While there are checklist purists out there who may disagree with my methods, let me offer this:  If you fly many different aircraft, whose checklists can be absent, inappropriate, out of date, etc. it is best to develop your own.  A good way to build that base, for everything from a J-3 Cub up to t Beech 18, is to use, what I’ll term, “the classics.”  CIGAR TIPS and GUMPS (more on GUMPS in another post.)

Continue reading CIGAR TIPS

Pattern Work

US Navy F-18 Landing Typical Profile

I’m near certain that umpteen zillion posts have written about this subject.  Nevertheless, here I go with my addition to the pile.

How do you teach students to land safely, who didn’t know how to fly a mere 10 hours ago?

The answer, to me, is 100% about feel, energy management (à la glider teaching), looking, sensing and adjusting as necessary.  A trap that I, and many of my colleagues, have fallen into is thinking that landing is something a student will embrace if they are given firm numbers, power settings, checkpoints etc.  Any type of recipe that emphasizes standardization exclusively does two big disservices to the student:

Continue reading Pattern Work

What Should You Charge as a CFI?

More money is safer.

As a new, old, or “returning” (in my case) CFI, a nagging question might be:  “WTF should I charge?”  And stumped you should be, since general aviation can be an opaque place that doesn’t love you back as much as you love it.  So you ask yourself, “How can I do this for a living?”  The answer is you can, but it takes a few key ingredients, rumination and simple action.

What a flight instructor is paid has a huge range and your question might be, where do you belong?  And how can you belong, appear, smell or act in such a way that you can ask for sustainable income?

Continue reading What Should You Charge as a CFI?

Your Seaplane Rating is Waiting

This is a Super Cub. It is ready.

If you live in northern California (or are passing through), and seek to be a more well rounded aviator, consider the wonders of a PA-18 Super Cub on straight floats.  It is mild mannered, reliable, honest and peppy enough to get you on the step and taking off in no time.

If you’re not a pilot, fear not – we can do an intro flight / scenic flight where you are at the controls and able to feel what airplanes used to feel like before runways became a thing.  Yes, you can be your very own Indiana Jones!  Accomplished commercial or airline transport pilot?  That “SEL” (Single Engine Land) on your ticket is lonely!  Make room for the “SES” (Single Engine Sea).

If you want to book a flight or get some rates, zip me a note.